This slide from a quantitive survey by Ipsos Mori came via slideshare

The full presentation is worth a read – it’s an easy read
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This is a worry – as most politicians will seek to trade on these perceptions rather that take a stand for the truth. They have learnt to go with the grain of beliefs rather than fight them, like the good brand marketers they have all become.

Interesting fact is that the one question we do get about right (across the world) is the one about our life expectancy, which might tell us something about narcissism and/or our eternal pre-occupation with our own mortality.

Other interesting fact is that Italy comes out first as the most ignorant nation and we don’t too badly-just ignorant.

Some – like Tracy Emin, Damian Hurst and GIlbert&George- have been in ad business for while. Their styles are so distinctive you know them immediately like a pack of Persil. They have mastered the art of effective branding – with “added value” prices to match

At modern art shows the same ‘big’ themes come up over and over again- here are three you can rely on.
1) The artist getting in touch with his/her inner child – Childhood is a time of both maximum innocence and psychological damage-or both. That tension is makes this a rich theme to exploreIMG_3123 IMG_3127 IMG_3117
2) Wearing  masks- a very ancient theme as it liberates the individual to take on different identities and or behave as badly with as they like. In films people always get murdered at masked balls. Venice loves masks-and is the original city of hidden dangers. Sadistic sex often involves masks- anyway you get the pointIMG_3173 IMG_3187 IMG_3168IMG_3167
3) Consumerism=polution 

Today there is just too much pollution . It is covering our beaches , making our rivers poisonous and air cancer inducing.

Our Madmen era pleasures in consumerism-those Andy Warhol soup cans seem so innocent now-have been undermined by the smelly decaying byproducts of our obsession with economic growth. Asia ( for which read China) is the epicentre of this collective act of greed & desire driven  self-distruction. Hence these images

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A old film but still a good one -

Scientific proof that to be more creative you have to find ways to be playful.

So if you work at an organisation that wants you to be more creative and yet puts you under constant stress and doesn’t provide the space and time to be playful then it is a contradiction in terms.

Now that Facebook and Twitter are public companies they are of course hungry for a bigger slice of the advertising pie. But-and it is a big but- they did not fundamentally start out as commercial spaces so they are have to innovate and come up with new advertising formats like “native ads” and “Likes” to get revenue to satisfy their shareholders. Thats ok- if they create formats with real value then they deserve a bigger slice.

Unfortunately these things can be “gamed”

The web – lovely and fascinating though it is – also a place for hucksters and scammers or , if you look at the so-called dark web , much worse. It is a world of link farms and low paid workers sitting behind screens and generating bullshit interest in brands (and other entities looking for business or audience) in return for a few pence.

I don’t blame Facebook. They don’t control the behaviour of others. Nobody can control the scammers.

But this short film explains some of the perils of this and in particular lifts the lid on how likes can be hyped to the point of being meaningless

BTW- it is worth adding that this is an age old problem of new advertising formats which can take a while before they become credible/respectable. In the early days of the poster industry there was a lot of “misreporting”

( to put it at its least libellous). I remember meeting “poster guys” in the Dog and Duck in soho and feeling that there was something a bit dodgy going on.  This was the 1980s I stress – all very above board now.

 

is the title of an enlightening and helpful little book by BJ Mendelson.

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It helps you sort out the crap from the hype. Some things that rang bells

Beware cyber hipster’s thought leadership

A whole class of cyber hipsters is busy creating and spreading hype because it helps their own business/raises their fees as public speakers. Heard of web 2.0? Yup. Tim O’Reilly – an uber cyber hipster -came up with it (probably) and has built a consulting business and a regular expensive conference on the back of it. He can stand for a whole class of cyber hipsters who swim around in the same pool and scratch each others backs- no different them from other walks of life then.


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There are very few pure social media successes

Many so called social media success stories – Think Old Spice man – are not really that. They also had big ad spend and top quality media production behind them.

Cui Bono ? is always a good question

Who benefits from the idea that social media are powerful in building brands?It’s the big platforms themselves- like Facebook and Twitter-who are trying to grab their share of the advertising pie.You’re a dinosaur if you are not using social media aren’t you? well, arent you?

Cue all sorts of “innovations” from these platforms to win more adspend – sponsored tweets/native ads-all of which will be boosted as the next big thing

Talent alone rarely wins out

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Beware the Justin Beiber myth- this is idea that someone with talent (yes he has got some painful to admit) can come from nowhere and break through big time. It is very rare. Mostly when you lift the lid on successes there are big media partners and/or adspend and various other (paid for) boosters behind it.

BJ Mendelson book is useful in helping you develop your bullshit detectors.

The Internet is so young that it is bound to be teaming with hucksters and charlatans- he calls them out.

But he overstates the case.

It may be naive to think that talent alone or great content will win through. Yet yet yet.. access is greatly increased.Everyone can now be a publisher/creator/filmaker/Writer now. You can build a following if you do it well – i.e. you are relevant and/or interesting. Bear in mind though if you have any success you will have to trade with big media and other big beasts of the Internet to get to the next level.

One other good reason to read this book is he has a whole section on how to “game the system” – i.e. get seen as an expert and win profile and followers.

Which rather proves the point that the system is much more open than before

 

smoke imageand other fascinating creations at the Digital Revolution show at the Barbican. Anyone in retail (or experiential marketing) will enjoy it. Why? With the growth of e-commerce the shop is changing-it has to evolve or die- and is becoming a form of entertainment in its own right

The digital instillations at the show are just the kind the thing that helps to reinvent the shop as a memorable experience.

The tech is expensive but as costs come down it goes mainstream – expect the likes of Nike,Apple and Burberry to pioneer it in their brand experience temples (which is what shops are becoming)

The early part of the show takes you through key stages in the history of gaming but it is the later parts that are worth dwelling on – fascinating cinematic quality animations,new ways of interacting with screens- and the story of how the film Gravity was made.

Behind this, I think,are two exciting trends

-gaming is very powerful,well funded and important in the UK and the inventiveness it has spawns flows out into all other kinds of creative work.

-Coders are now collaborating with artists and creators of all types-musicians, sculptors, painter, fashion designers. This cross fertilisation is making digital creativity somethings that appeals to all the senses.Physical,playful,fascinating.

Take the Nintendo Wii ( gaming again) and how it helped gaming open up to new audiences with its “gesture based wireless control interface” . Now that technology is being evolved in new and more creative ways. I for one could not resist seeing smoke pour out of my eyes.