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Simon Jacks, BBC business correspondent, said, on the 10 O’Clock news, that Sir Martin was thought off more as “a money man than an adman”, thus repeating some of the snooty and hoary old remarks that were said against him by the likes of David Ogilvy years back .

Jacks seems to me to have missed something important about the man

Sir Martin was certainly creative about business and, less well known, is his delight in winning new business pitches. This is as vital to the health of a creative agency as the creative department. In fact without the wins you have nothing for creative people to get their teeth into.

Here is my Sir Martin story.

In 1998 I took over as Chief Executive of red cell advertising ( a WPP company)  and immediately found myself a re-pitch for my largest client – Bank of Scotland’s direct banking arm- up against BBH and McCann. Not good news. I knew BBH would field Sir John Hegarty and McCann had big resources and, at that time, offices throughout the UK. red cell was an agency of some 40 people with some decent clients – Singapore airlines, Alfa Romeo, Wales Tourism board amongst others- but I was heavily outgunned.

My calculation was the BoS would be more likely to know who Martin was ( he was not Sir Martin then) than Sir John Hegarty

I pick up the phone to Martin and said I would aim to keep the business  by proposing a WPP team in partnership with Ogilvy One. Would he come to the pitch? He seemed delighted to be asked  and said he did not just want to “be decorative and to give him an active role”. He wanted to present the offer to the board of Bank of Scotland as part of the team. I also commissioned a radio program about the future of finance – ie a piece of content marketing- to show our creative credentials and so as not to look like our whole pitch rested on Martin.

Well it probably did. We won. I well remember the squeek of delight Martin let out when I called to let him know. red cell was an agency dedicated to challenger brands and challenger thinking. In other words we stood with the underdogs. Although Martin went on to head a huge company, I think he never lost his passion for winning against the odds and seeing off staid and established competitors. That is why i think he responded so full heartedly to my call.

So Jacks I think missed something essential about the man – his creativity in business and the sheer visceral pleasure he takes in competing to win. In this respect he is an adman to his finger tips

For the 20 anniversary issue of Market Leader I looked back to the predictions made by The Economist in 1998 (what did they get right and wrong ?) and brought it up to date with 2018 predictions.

Looking back was fascinating – The Economist got a lot right but on a couple of things they got it completely wrong – especially when it came to the Queen v Tony Blair

This article is reproduced with the permission of WARC.com. See Link to PDF

018-019 Saunders

At the privacy of our own keyboards people give up all sorts of interesting insights into what they want – and no  data source is better that search. So..

Google trends is always worth a look – as well as Think with Google for a barometer for changing consumer culture- and therefore what people now expect of organisations

A few of stats that struck me (below) : people want to find out stuff right here, right now and on their mobiles. Researchers often say this is because consumers are becoming more “demanding”- but I don’t think that is our self – perception. This is just the new normal. Basically what its says is that your company or organisation has to have got its act together on

a) Being easy to find on a smartphone

b) Offering up relevant and useful information (that is easy to find) on a smartphone

c) Being easy to buy from on a smartphone

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The idea that Big Tech has really evolved into over-powerful “Tech behemoths” has been gathering strength in 2017 – and not just in the protectionist minds of the EU

The seminar book – that makes the case for break up- is Move Fast and Break Things  by Jonathan Taplin and is my business book of the year. I read it cover to cover.

Now influential professor Scott Galloway ( at NYU Stern) has made his case too. It is worth 30 minutes of your time 

So the argument are gathering strengths

Sentiment is turning too- as it did against Tesco and News International. Big tech with their (tax avoiding) global businesses make these once much feared companies look positively weedy.

 

 

My  case for investment is just published in Aurora ( Pakistan’s leading marketing and advertising periodical) and is reproduced with their kind permission.

I think that the argument applies to all markets.

Agencies, most of which are under competitive pressure and enduring tighter margins, need to invest if they are to be credible business partners for clients – and not just suppliers of communication. How smart is your agency - Julian Saunders

Memories of my recent visit to Karachi and Lahore, at the invitation of Pakistan Advertisers Society, to run my seminar “Brand Building in the digital age”

This piece has just been published in the latest issue of Market Leader and is reproduced with their kind permission. Article hereSaunders

Plus pics of “The welders”,”The landlord”, and the “Wrestler from Peshawar” – who feature in the piece

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